AUSTRALIAN SLANG PDF

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dictionaries the past and present Australian slang or colloquialisms are well documented. Australian slang contributes to a vocabulary that most Australians . PDF | On Jan 1, , James Lambert and others published The Macquarie Australian Slang Dictionary. Learn the 30 coolest Australian slang words here, and you'll sound like an Download: This blog post is available as a convenient and portable PDF that you .


Australian Slang Pdf

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It wasn't easy but we've tried to include uniquely Australian slang here and to exclude British and American slang even though these are. Australian slang unites the true-blue and the dinky-di and separates the cheeky little possums Images in this PDF are provided at approximately A4 @ dpi. The picture commonly painted of the Australian using a heavy proportion of slang terms in his talk when com pared with speakers in other countries is difficult to.

One confusing matter is that five shillings prior to decimal currency was called a "Dollar", in reference to the Spanish Dollar and "Holey Dollar" which circulated at a value of five shillings, but the Australian Dollar at the introduction of decimal currency was fixed at 10 shillings. Football[ edit ] Australia has four codes of football, rugby league , rugby union , Australian rules football , and soccer. Generally, rugby league is called football in New South Wales and Queensland, while rugby union is called either rugby or union throughout.

Both rugby league and rugby union are often collectively referred to as rugby in other states where Australian rules football is called football. Australian rules football is commonly referred to as "Aussie Rules" throughout Australia, but may also in Victoria and South Australia be loosely called "footy" outside the context of the Australian Football League.

Association football was long known as "soccer" in Australia and still persists. Referring to pleasant behaviour b.

A satisfying conclusion or agreement Goodo - Something that meets the requirements, is good enough and acceptable Good guts - Accurate information Come on mate, you got it all wrong! Let me give you the good guts. Good oil - Dependable, correct information given in confidence Good sort - A benevolent, kind woman Good looking sort - A charismatic lady Goodie - An expression denoting ones disbelief of an excuse You mean you didnt come because you thought it was a Sunday because your parrot said so, now thats a goodie!

Got the game by the throat - To wield absolute control over a situation We had a rough patch last year, but ever since Jason took over as the new CEO, we seem to have got the game by the throat!

Grid - Bicycle Grizzle guts - Someone who constantly complains Gross - Repugnant, detestable Grotty - Dirty, lousy, loathsome, disgusting That hospital was so grotty, Id get sick just being there!

Grouse - An expression denoting something good or positive Grub - Food Mate, Im awfully hungry Grungy - Deplorable, in a wretched condition, shabby Grunt - Power Grunter - Pig Gun - An adept in ones work area Gunner - Someone who promises to do a lot yet delivers no results Hes always gunner do this and gunner do that..

Gunk - Dirt, filth, garbage Guts a. Someone who kicks up agitation That mans a guts ache for sure! Some guts! An ill mannered person I have no intention of befriending that man.. Stomach Do as I tell ya or Ill kick you right in the gut!

Guts, spill all ones - To tell everyone Wait till you hear her spill all her guts Gutser, come a a.

30 Awesomely Abbreviated Australian Slang Words

Suffer an accident He came a good gutser A failure He probably didnt work hard enough He came a good gutser! Gutsy - Courageous, brave Gyp - Defraud someone H 1. Hair, put hair on ones chest - To partake of food or drink to energize onself or induce good health Why dont you join us for a drink? Itll put some hair on yer chest! Handbag - A male companion to a more successful female, who is however perceived as being just an adjunct.

Handball - Shirk off ones responsibility and pass it onto another in a way that it cannot be rejected 5.

Handle oneself - To stand up and fight for oneself Jia can handle herself Mom.. Hang around like a bad smell - Someone who hangs around and constantly keeps harassing and pestering Even when youve given them ample hints, they hang around like a bad smell.

Hang fire - To request for time, to slow down Hang fire mate I need some time to think about this. Hang on a tick - Hang on for a short while 9. Hang out, Let it all hang out - Speak without holding back ones emotions For once, I let it all hang out! Happy as Larry - Euphoric, ecstatic Hard boiled - Someone with a rough and tough countenance Hard, treated - Treated unjustly Hard up - Bankrupt Have a go - A suggestion that one is expected to perform better Have a go brother Have someone on - To face a challenge Its going to be a difficult match Have the wood on someone - To have an edge over another Have tickets on yourself - To have a very high opinion of ones own self Hay burner - Horse Head, Have ones head screwed on - To exercise ones common sense or mature wisdom Head, need ones head read - To turn crazy Head, pull your head in - To stop interfering Heaps, give someone heaps - To scold or rebuke someone, to be annoyed Heart-starter - An alcoholic drink consumed early in the day Heat, put the heat on - To use compulsion or force Hide - Referring to someone who is impudent or brazen By Jove What a thick hide that fellow has!

Hide, take it out on - Beat up, Subject to punishment He deserves a good beating for being so mischievous I will take it out on his hide. Hit the deck - To wake up Hock, in hock - Drowned in debts Hollow legs - A voracious eater who, however, doesnt put on weight Home and hosed, Home and dry - Signalling completion Were almost done with our trip Honcho - Person in authority The head honcho of the operation met with a sudden crash. Hook, to sling ones hook - To call it a day, to get done with the days work Hooks, put the hooks into - To borrow Hoon - Silly, rash person Hooroo - Goodbye Hoot a.

Comical, hilarious Miley is amazing company Indifferent Anyway, he doesnt give a hoot how we work out things Worthless Hes overcharging Hop, on the hop a. Continuously busy b. Caught offhand Hop into - Criticize someone Hop over - Jump over Horse, flogging a dead horse - A vain attempt at recovering a lost position Horse, to hold ones horses - To control ones haste Hot under the collar - Peevish, angry Hot, in hot water - In grave trouble Hot to trot - Showing keen interest or readiness to do something Hullabaloo - Ruckus, din Humdinger - An expert at work, exceptional Hungry a.

Avaricious b. One who is not a good team player Iceberg, Bondi Iceberg - One who is a regular winter swimmer 2. Icky spot - A difficult situation I need some help with this problem here Iffy - Arousing suspicion or doubt, tricksy 4.

Illywacker - A sure-footed trickster 5.

2. Macca’s

In good nick - In good condition, in good shape 6. In for it - To be in for a reprimand Youve been wasting a lot of time mate, youre in for it now!! In it - To be a part of something You were as much in it all the time as Jason and to think we never even doubted you!

In like - To take every opportunity that comes ones way 9. Refers to someone who has a good chance of success In the bag - Guaranteed With all those credentials to your credit, this job already seems in your bag, mate! In the chair - Your turn to pay for the drinks In thing - Something that is in vogue or in fashion This is the latest fad Ink, full of ink - Having consumed cheap wine, Obnoxiously intoxicated In your face - To confront someone or say something provocative Ins and outs of a cats arse - The complexities in a problem Irish curtains - Spiderwebs Iron out - Resolve some problems I need more resources to help me iron out the issues at hand, John.

Iron someone out - Beat up someone, Knock down someone What a menace this bloke is!

I have a good mind to iron him out. Iron ones self out - To get drunk deliberately Its been the biggest achievement for me till date Im going to iron meself out today! Iron, to strike while the iron is hot - To make hay while the sun shines, To act without delay Dont you procrastinate Jack a. To have negligible or absolutely no knowledge on a subject, to know nothing. He makes a big show though he doesnt know Jack.

You sure asked the wrong person He knows Jack shit! A common term denoting everyone, every man Seemed like every Jack had been called for that meeting.

Jack of - To be tired of something, to have had enough of something I cant take this anymore Im jack of this ton load of work! Im jack of your tantrums, Meir.

Jackaroo - A male trainee worker at a farm 4. I guess she needs some rest! Jack up - Dissatisfied workers, ready to stop work in order to press for their demands The entire incident has left a bad taste in the mouth Jacks - Police Caught ya bugger Jacky - Be good This lesson is important Jacky - Laugh like a kookaburra, an Australian kingfisher that has a loud, cackling cry; to laugh raucously He laughs like jacky!

Jacky - Work laboriously I worked like a jacky, struggled day and night, and yet turned out late for the submission Jackeroo - A person employed at a remote cattle farm as a learner That jackeroo sure knows his job well. Jillaroo - A female trainee worker at a farm Jag - By chance, by luck Wow Did I jag that win! Jake - Allright, Good, satisfactory, acceptable It will be jake mate, dont worry!

Jeez - An exclamatory remark that shows surprise or wonder or awe Jeez! What a tall building that is! Job - To whack someone, to hit someone Ill job ya if ya dont buck up, you bludger!

Joe blake - Those species of Australian serpents that are highly poisonous Dont fool around with that one Joe blakes - Acute delirium or shaking caused by drinking excessive alcohol Hes got the joe blakes! Jacky Howe - A collarless garment worn by shearers or workers. Jacky Howe was a champion shearer, who won accolades for shearing sheep a day, using manual shears.

This eponymous term is derived from the singlet Jacky Howe wore. Joe Bloggs, Joe Blow - An average man, the ordinary citizen; One who represents the common Aussie Every jack and joe blogg has been agitating against that move by the government.

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Joey - A baby kangaroo Look at that joey in its mothers pouch Joey in the pouch - Pregnant, carrying a baby Shes up the duff Joeys - small children Those joeys have amazing IQ! Joggers - Sports shoes Put on your joggers and get ready for the race, mate! Joke, its a - A weird, nonsensical or ridiculous suggestion Are you serious?

This is impossible Its a joke! Joker - A funny weirdo What a joker that bloke is! Jumbuck - Sheep Woolly, cud chewing, usually horned mammals belonging to the goat family Jump, take a jump at yourself - Suggesting that one should review ones attitude, behaviour or poor performance Youve been fooling around quite a lot Just down the road - A term often used subjectively to denote distance, just round the turn or just round the corner K 1.

Kacky - A left handed person Did you notice that hes a kacky hander? For us, footy is rugby. Have you heard of rugby? We love it so much that there are 4 major types. Beyond these, there are even more way to play and leagues to join.

We call this soccer like the Americans do. Aussies love to talk about footy. If you do get caught in a conversation about football, you should be prepared to spend hours listening. Biccy is short for biscuit. Be warned—in Australia, a biccy biccies is the plural is many things.

Essential Aussie Slang for International Students

A biccy can be a cracker, cookie American or a plain, slightly sweet round snack you eat with your tea. Use the word choccy. This abbreviation is more of a nickname. Think of it as a cute name for your laptop!

ACDC is the most Australian famous band. Everyone in Australia knows about Accadacca! Devastated is often shortened to devo.

In context, it would be used in this way:. So, devo means just really upset. In Australia we call it something completely different.

Well, we often have a mini-market inside each gas station. They sell food and offer other services. So, after you fill up your car with petrol, you can also download milk, coffee, water, credit for your phone, maybe a latte, sometimes you can even pay your bills.

Of course, 4 syllables—ser-vice-sta-tion—is too much effort for us, so we have abbreviated it to servo. This word is more common among younger people. So, after you go to the servo, you fill up your car with petty petrol.

Remember, petrol is what we call gasoline. In Australia, many of our beers are sold in cans. We call these tins. There are many abbreviations for job titles.

The most commonly abbreviated occupations are those which we have day-to-day contact with, meaning we see or interact with them very often. As the original white settlers in Australia were English convicts criminals , the term copper probably came over from England. Of course, with our accent and way with words, it sounds a little different in Australia. For example, electricians, plumbers and carpenters have trade jobs.

Not just anybody can have one, you need to learn how first. This is simple: A postie is a postman, someone who delivers our letters and parcels every day.

Anyone who plays in a band at a pub is referred to as a muso. Most of the time they get a small amount of money and free beer for performing at their local watering hole pub. A cabbie is a cab driver or taxi driver. We usually refer to cabs as taxis in Australia…however we prefer to use to noun cabbie for the taxi driver.

Americans use this term as well.Aboriginal influence When the first white settlers arrived there were over separate languages spoken by the traditional owners of this country. The way he is leading his life, he will soon turn into a Matilda. I guess she needs some rest! It is entirely up to Aussies how their language will develop.

A crude bad-mannered person 2. For example if you experience some luck then you may be referred to as a 'lucky bastard' in a positive sense. Lappy This abbreviation is more of a nickname. Continuously busy b.